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Quebec’s Universal Access to Low-Fee Child Care: Les Centres de la Petite Enfance

Posted by Alison Homer on June 4, 2021

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Access to affordable and quality childcare is an important poverty reduction and prevention strategy, as it supports children’s social, behavioural and cognitive skills, readiness for and transition to school, and lifelong physical and emotional health. It supports parents and caregivers to increase their income, opens doors to employment and training, builds resilience, and reduces chronic stress.

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Guelph-Wellington Built for Zero reduces chronic youth homelessness by 76%

Posted by Guelph-Wellington Built for Zero on May 19, 2021

This success story was featured at Cities Reducing Poverty’s 2021 National Gathering: The End of Poverty as part of the workshop Built for Zero: A Model for Ending Chronic Homelessness.

In 2018, after becoming a Built for Zero Canada community, Guelph-Wellington conducted their second Point in Time Count/Registry Week which identified 203 people, including 62 youth, that were experiencing chronic homelessness. Through this survey, the community learned that almost half of all respondents had experienced their first instance of homelessness as a youth.

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A Dignified Disability Supplement as a Pathway to Ending Poverty

Posted by Elle Richards on May 18, 2021

According to Statistics Canada, 6.2 million Canadians are estimated to be living with a disability. People with disabilities are likely to be living in poverty – this figure is as high as 30% - due to societal barriers including discrimination, access to education and employment, and protective social programs. Stats Canada reports a mere 40-59% in employment, depending on the severity of the disability, as compared with 80% of the rest of the population.

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Ending Indigenous Poverty in Cities

Posted by Jill Zacharias on May 17, 2021

In the last year, the COVID-19 pandemic coupled with the opioid crisis has further revealed the depths of inequity and devastating impacts of trauma on vulnerable populations, as well as gaps in our social safety nets and limitations of policies aimed to reduce poverty and harm. While the crisis has exacerbated these inequities, it has also increased awareness and built momentum for new policies and systems change. In urban centres across the country, Indigenous people are working independently and with others to support pathways out of poverty for Indigenous children, families and elders.

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