The Latest

Contribute. We love to hear your thoughts, your musings and your latest work. Please share with us!
Write a post

Nick Falvo

Nick Falvo
Nick Falvo is Director of Research and Data at the Calgary Homeless Foundation. His area of research is social policy, with a focus on poverty, housing, homelessness and social assistance. Nick has a PhD in public policy from Carleton University. Fluently bilingual, he is a member of the editorial board of the Canadian Review of Social Policy / Revue canadienne de politique sociale. Contact him at: nick@calgaryhomeless.com.
Find me on:

Recent Posts

Ten Things to Know About Poverty Measurement in Canada

Posted by Nick Falvo on November 8, 2019

This article was originally published at nickfalvo.ca

On October 29, I gave a guest presentation to Professor Filipe Duarte’s master’s seminar class at the University of Windsor. The topic of my presentation was poverty measurement in Canada.

Read More

The Use of Homelessness Shelters by Indigenous Peoples in Canada

Posted by Nick Falvo on October 11, 2019
The Canadian Press recently gained access to results of analysis of the use of homeless shelters across Canada by Indigenous peoples. The results are summarized in a March 2019 slide presentation obtained by Jordan Press through an Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) request, and are discussed in this Canadian Press article. They are based on a research project conducted by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC).
Read More

Homelessness, Harm reduction and Housing First

Posted by Nick Falvo on June 4, 2019

I was recently invited to give a presentation at a two-day event discussing the overdose crisis and First Nations, with a focus on southern Alberta. My presentation focused on homelessness, substance use, harm reduction and Housing First.

With this in mind, here are 10 things to know:

Read More

The Introduction and Evolution of Child Benefits in Canada

Posted by Nick Falvo on May 5, 2017

Child benefits have significant potential to reduce homelessness and the need for emergency shelter beds by putting more money into the hands of low-income parents. They also can (and do) reduce child poverty, though not always as much as governments claim. And because they do not carry the same stigma as other forms of poverty-reduction initiatives (such as social assistance and social housing), they’re also popular among voters—certainly more popular than social assistance benefits for adults. Many elected officials are therefore more eager to create and enhance child benefits than they are to spend on other forms of poverty-reduction.

Since they were first established child benefits in Canada have changed significantly in their intention, their recipients, and their method of delivery. Here’s an eight-step guide to that evolution.

Read More

Advocacy in Canada’s Affordable Housing and Homelessness Sectors

Posted by Nick Falvo on April 26, 2017

This blog was originally posted on the Calgary Homelessness Foundation website on April 24, 2017 by Nick Falvo, and is re-posted here with permission.

Read More

How Housing Policy Benefits from a Socioeconomic Perspective

Posted by Nick Falvo on December 21, 2016

On November 17, I delivered a webinar presentation for the Canadian Housing and Renewal Association titled “The Missing Piece: How Housing Policy Benefits from a Socioeconomic Perspective.”

The presentation focused on both macroeconomic factors and factors pertaining to Canada’s social welfare system in general; I argued that leaders in Canada’s non-profit housing sector should be mindful of such issues (and not just focus on housing and homelessness).  My PowerPoint presentation can be downloaded here; the entire webinar can be viewed here.

Here are 10 things to know:

Read More