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PAPER | Approaches to Measuring: Community Change Indicators

Evaluating Community Impact, Publications, Cities Reducing Poverty

This paper consolidates the research and content of four previously published papers measuring less poverty in communities, more vibrant communities, more collaboration and more citizen engagement. This consolidated research paper was developed by Vibrant Communities with the financial assistance of The Ontario Trillium Foundation.
Liz Weaver, Paul Born, Denise Whaley

By Liz Weaver, Paul Born, Denise Whaley

Liz leads the Tamarack Learning Centre providing strategic direction for the design and development of learning activities. Liz is one of Tamarack's highly regarded trainers and has developed and delivered curriculum on a variety of workshop topics including collaborative governance, leadership, collective impact, community innovation, influencing policy change and social media for impact and engagement. Paul Born is the President and cofounder of the Tamarack Institute which, since 2001, has provided leadership in Canada on issues of citizen engagement, collaborative leadership and community innovation. More than 12,000 subscribers engage in Tamarack's learning communities. Tamarack also sponsors Vibrant Communities Canada, active in cities across the country and that has so far reduced the impact of poverty for more than 200,000 people. Denise Whaley is a Member of the Canadian Institute of Planners and a Registered Professional Planner who specializes in Rural Planning and Development. She has also provided expert testimony in Land Use Planning before the Ontario Municipal Board. Her specialties include Public Consultation and Facilitation, Community, Economic Development, Heritage and Tourism Planning. Denise is an active community volunteer.

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